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Aimovig

Pronunciation: AIM-oh-vig
Name of the Generic: Erenumab.
The Brand Name: Aimovig SureClick Automatic Injector.
Drug Class: CGRP inhibitors.

What is Aimovig?

Aimovig is an anti-monoclonal antibody that inhibits the activation of a particular protein that triggers the symptoms of a migraine attack. The protein, known as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), can make blood vessels expand and result in inflammation in the head and neck. the headache of migraine headache pain.

Aimovig is a prescribed medicine that is used to prevent the occurrence of migraines in adults. Aimovig can also be used to treat conditions not covered in this medication guide.

Warnings

Before injecting Aimovig, make sure you read the label on your single-dose prefilled autoinjector or single-dose prefilled syringe to confirm that you are using the correct medication and the proper dosage.

Follow all the instructions on your prescription label and the packaging. Inform your health professionals about your medical issues, allergies, and all medications you take.

Before You Take This Drug

It is not recommended to take Aimovig if you are allergic to Erenumab. Aimovig is not a product that has been approved to be used by anyone younger than 18 years of age.

Consult your physician if you are pregnant or planning to be pregnant. It is not clear if the drug erenumab could cause harm to a baby who is not yet born. However, suffering from migraines during pregnancy could lead to complications like preeclampsia (dangerously high blood pressure that could lead to health issues for the pregnant mother as well as the baby). The advantages of avoiding migraine headaches can outweigh the risks for the baby.

It may not be safe to breastfeed while consuming this medicine. Go right to your doctor about any potential risks.

How to take Aimovig?

Follow the exact instructions for Aimovig given by your physician. Follow the directions on the prescription label and study all medication guides or instruction sheets. Aimovig is injected beneath the skin (subcutaneously) every month. A doctor may show you how to use the medication on your own. If your doctor recommends a dose of 70 mg for you, then take one injection. If your healthcare professional recommends a dose of 140 mg, then take two injections, one after the other, with a different prefilled autoinjector or syringe that is prefilled in each of the injections. If you are planning to utilize the same site on your body to administer the two injections, be sure that the second injection is not in the same location as the initial injection.

Follow and read carefully any instructions that are included with your medication. Avoid using Aimovig if you aren't familiar with the complete instructions for using it. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any queries. Preparing your Aimovig injection is only necessary when you're ready to administer it. Avoid using it when the medication is changing color or has particles. Contact your pharmacist to inquire about the latest medication.

The syringe or autoinjector is intended for one use only. Dispose of it after just one use, even if there's still some medicine within. Don't shake your syringe autoinjector otherwise, you risk ruining the medication.The dosage you require could change when you change to a different brand or strength of this medication. Be sure to use only the strength and form the doctor recommends.Place Aimovig inside its original container in the refrigerator. Aimovig should be kept away from light and heat. Do not keep it in the freezer. Remove the medicine from the refrigerator and allow it to be at room temperature for 30 minutes prior to injecting the dose. Keep away from direct sunlight. Don't heat the medicine with hot water or in the microwave.You can store the medication in the refrigerator for up to seven days at room temperature.

Make use of a needle and syringe just once, and then put them into the puncture-proof "sharps" container. Be sure to follow the laws of your state or city regarding how to dispose of the container. Keep it out of the reach of pets and children.

Details on Dosage

Usual Adult Dose for Migraine Prophylaxis:

70 mg subcutaneously, once a month
Some patients might benefit from subcutaneously ingesting 140 mg every month.
Comments:
140 mg is recommended in two subcutaneous injections of 70 mg each.
Use: To prevent the treatment of migraine.

What Happens If I Miss a Dose?

If you fail to remember if you've taken your dosage or cannot get the dose according to the time, then take your missed dose as quickly as you can. Once you have remembered, you can keep taking Aimovig as a single dose every month, starting from the date you took your last dose.

What Happens If I Overdose?

Get medical attention in an emergency or contact the poison help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should be Avoided?

Avoid injecting this medication into skin that is red, bruised, tender, or hard.

Side Effects of Aimovig

Contact a medical professional immediately in the event that you exhibit symptoms of an allergy reaction, such as hives, breathing difficulties, or swelling of your lips, face, and tongue.

See your doctor right away. If you suffer from:

  • Constipation with extreme severity or symptoms like stomach nausea, vomiting, swelling of the stomach, or bloating.
  • Extreme severe headache, blurred vision, or pounding in your neck or ear.

Adverse effects of Aimovig include:

  • Constipation.
  • Swelling, pain, or redness at the site where the medicine was injected.

This is not a comprehensive list of all the side effects. Other side effects could occur. Contact your doctor to seek medical advice on the effects. You can report any side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Interaction With Other Drugs?

Other medications may interfere with erenumab. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Inform your physician about your current medications and any medications you begin or stop taking.

DRUG STATUS

Availability

Prescription only

Pregnancy & Lactation

CSA Schedule*

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