The Web Health

Subscribe

Adcetris

Generic name: brentuximab vedotin [bren-TUX-i-mab-ve-DOE-tin]
Drug class: CD30 monoclonal antibodies

What is Adcetris?

Adcetris is a treatment for certain kinds of lymphoma. It is prescribed when cancer cells express the protein CD30 that is present on the surface (CD30-positive).

Adcetris is a drug that targets the CD30 protein to inhibit the spread and growth of cancerous cells within the body.

Adcetris is used in conjunction with other cancer drugs for the treatment of adults and children suffering from Hodgkin lymphoma, which has never been treated previously.

Adcetris is used for adult patients suffering from Hodgkin lymphoma after having an autologous stem cell transplant or those who have received any other treatments for cancer and the cancer has recurred,  is likely to return, or is not responding.

Adcetris is combined with other cancer drugs to treat patients of adult age with anaplastic large cell lymphoma that was not previously treated, hasn't been treated, or has returned in the aftermath of treatment by other cancer drugs.

Adcetris can also be employed to manage mycosis fungoides.

Warnings

It is not recommended to take Adcetris while you are receiving a different cancer treatment known as bleomycin.

Adcetris can cause a serious brain infection that could cause disability or even death. Consult your physician immediately if you experience issues with speech, thinking, or vision, as well as muscle movement.

Before you Take this Drug 

It is not recommended to treat Adcetris if you are intolerant to brentuximab's vedotin or

  • If you're also taking another cancer drug known as bleomycin.

To ensure that Adcetris is suitable for you, ask your doctor if you've ever experienced:

  • Diabetes

  • Liver disease;

  • Kidney disease or

  • Peripheral blood vessel disease like Raynaud's disease.

Both women and men taking this medicine must use effective birth control methods to avoid pregnancy. Brentuximab vedotin can cause harm to an unborn baby as well as birth defects when the father or mother is taking this medication.

Use birth control for a minimum of six months following your most recent dose of the drug. Contact your physician immediately in the event of a pregnancy occurring while one of the mothers or fathers is taking this medicine.

Breastfeeding is not advised when you are taking Adcetris.

How to Take Adcetris?

Adcetris is administered as an injection into the vein. Your healthcare provider will offer you the injection.

Adcetris is generally prescribed every 2 or 3 weeks. Follow the instructions of your doctor for dosing extremely carefully.

You might also be prescribed additional medications to help you avoid severe adverse side effects or an allergic reaction. Use these medications as long as your physician has prescribed them.

Brentuximab Vedotin may reduce the number of blood cells in your body. Your blood needs to be checked frequently. The treatment for cancer may be delayed depending on the results.

Brentuximab doses for vedotin depend on weight.If you are in need of surgery, inform your surgeon that you are currently taking this medication. You might have to stop taking the medicine for a brief period.

Detail on Dosage 

Usual Adult Dose for Hodgkin's Disease:

Prior to treatment, State III or IV Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma: 1.2 mg/kg (maximum 120 mg) Inject for 30 minutes when combined with chemotherapy; administered every two weeks up to 12 doses of disease progression or toxicity that is unacceptable.

Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Consolidation: 1.8 mg/kg (maximum 180 mg) Inject for 30 minutes; begin therapy between 4 and 6 weeks after auto-HSCT or the recovery from auto-HSCT. Continue to administer every 3 weeks until 16 cycles maximum, progression of disease, or toxicity that is unacceptable.

Relapsed classical Hodgkin's lymphoma: 1.8 mg/kg (maximum 180 mg) Inject for 30 minutes; take each 3 weeks up to development or unacceptably toxic

The relapse of Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma or DC30-Expressing Mycosis (MF): 1.8 mg/kg (maximum 180 mg) in 30 minutes; administered every 3 weeks for the maximum number of cycles is 16, in the event of disease progression or unacceptable toxic effects.

Relapsed Large Cell Lymphoma: 1.8 mg/kg (maximum 180 mg) Inject for 30 minutes; administer every 3 weeks until progression of the disease or toxicity is unacceptable.

Comments:

The dose for patients who weigh more than 100 kg must be calculated on the basis of 100 kg of weight.

In patients with previously untreated Stage III or IV cHL who are treated with this drug plus doxorubicin, vinblastine, or dacarbazine (AVD), administer G-CSF beginning with Cycle 1.

Uses:

For Stage III cancers that have not been treated previously or IV classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) in conjunction with chemotherapy.

Adult patients suffering from cHL are at high risk for worsening or relapse after autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (auto-HSCT) consolidation.

Adults with cHL after failure of auto-HSCT or following failure of two prior chemotherapy regimens with multiple agents in patients who aren't auto-HSCT candidates

For adults who have the lymphoma called systemic anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (sALCL) following failure of at least one previous multi-agent chemotherapy regimen

Adults with pcALCL and CD30-expressing mycosis (MF) with MF who've had prior treatment with systemic drugs

Usual Adult Dose for Mycosis Fungoides:

The patient has not been treated previously. III or IV Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma 1.2 mg/kg (maximum 120 mg) Inject for 30 minutes in conjunction with chemotherapy. Give it every two weeks until 12 doses in the course of disease or toxicity are unacceptable.

Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Consolidation: 1.8 mg/kg (maximum 180 mg) in 30 minutes Begin treatment between 4 and 6 weeks following auto-HSCT, or upon recovering from auto-HSCT; take every 3 weeks, until the maximum number of cycles is 16 or until disease progress, or toxicity that is unacceptable.

Relapsed Hodgkin Lymphoma Classical: 1.8 mg/kg (maximum 180 mg) Inject for 30 minutes; take each 3 weeks up to development or unacceptably toxic

Acutely relapsed primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma and DC30-expressing mycosis (MF): 1.8 mg/kg (maximum 180 mg) Inject for 30 minutes; give it every 3 weeks for 16 cycles maximum, and disease progression or toxicity that is unacceptable

Relapsed Large Cell Lymphoma: 1.8 mg/kg (maximum 180 mg) Inject for 30 minutes; take every 3 weeks up to the point of disease progression or unacceptably toxic

Comments:

Patients who weigh over 100 kilograms should be calculated on the basis of 100 kg of weight.

In patients with previously untreated Stage III or IV cHL who are treated with this drug plus doxorubicin, vinblastine, or dacarbazine (AVD), administer G-CSF beginning with Cycle 1.

Uses:

For Stage III cancers that have not been treated previously or IV classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) when combined with chemotherapy.

For adult patients with cHL with a high risk of relapse or worsening as post-autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT) consolidation

Adults with cHL after auto-HSCT failure or failure of two prior chemotherapy regimens with multiple agents in patients who aren't auto-HSCT candidates

For adults who have systemic anaplastic lymphoma (sALCL) following failure in at least one previous chemotherapy regimen with multiple agents

For adults with pcALCL or CD30-expressing mycosis (MF) who've had previous treatment with systemic steroids.

Usual Adult Dose for Lymphoma:

The patient has not been treated previously. III or IV Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma 1.2 mg/kg (maximum 120 mg) in 30 minutes when combined with chemotherapy. Give it every two weeks up to the maximum dose of 12 in the course of disease, or unacceptably toxic

Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Consolidation: 1.8 mg/kg (maximum 180 mg) in 30 minutes; begin treatment within 4 to 6 weeks following auto-HSCT or upon the recovery from auto-HSCT. Continue to administer every 3 weeks until the maximum number of cycles is 16 or until disease progress or unacceptably toxic

Relapsed Hodgkin Lymphoma Classical: 1.8 mg/kg (maximum 180 mg) Inject for 30 minutes; take each 3 weeks up to development or unacceptably toxic

The relapsed cutaneous large-cell lymphoma and DC30-expressing mycosis (MF): 1.8 mg/kg (maximum 180 mg) in 30 minutes; give it every 3 weeks for 16 cycles maximum, unless the disease progresses or there are unacceptable toxicities.

The treatment for relapsed systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma: 1.8 mg/kg (maximum 180 mg) in 30 minutes; take every 3 weeks up to the point of disease progression or toxicity is unacceptable.

Comments:

Patients who weigh more than 100 kg must be calculated using 100 kg of weight.

In patients with previously untreated Stage III or IV cHL who are treated with this drug plus doxorubicin, vinblastine, or dacarbazine (AVD), administer G-CSF beginning with Cycle 1.

Uses:

For Stage III cancers that have not been treated previously or IV classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) in conjunction with chemotherapy.

Adult patients suffering from cHL with a high risk of relapse or progress as post-autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT) consolidation

For adults who have cHL following the failure of auto-HSCT or failure of two prior chemotherapy regimens using multiple agents and who aren't auto-HSCT candidates.

For adults suffering from systemic anaplastic lymphoma (sALCL) after the failure of at least one previous multi-agent chemotherapy regimen

For adults with pcALCL or mycosis fungoides that express CD30 (MF) with MF who've had previous systemic therapy

Usual Pediatric Dose for Hodgkin's Disease:

Prior to treatment, high-risk classical Hodgkin lymphoma: 1.8 mg/kg IV in 30 minutes (maximum 180 mg) every 3 weeks, for up to 5 doses

Use: Children two years of age or older who have previously untreated high-risk classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) in combination with vincristine, doxorubicin, and etoposide. Prednisone and cyclophosphamide

What Happens If I Miss a Dose?

Contact your doctor if you missed an appointment for the Adcetris shot.

What Happens If I Overdose?

Get medical attention in an emergency or contact the Poison Help line toll-free at 1-800-222-1222.

What Should be Avoided?

Brentuximab vedotin may be absorbed by body fluids (urine, feces, or vomit). At least for the first 48 hours following the time you received the dose, you should not allow the body fluids you drink to come into contact with your hands or any other surfaces. Caregivers must wear rubber gloves when cleaning a patient's body fluids, handling contaminated trash or laundry, or changing diapers. Clean hands prior to and after taking off gloves. Cleanse linens and clothing that have been soiled separately from the rest of the laundry.

Side Effects of Adcetris

See a doctor immediately. If you are experiencing symptoms warning of an allergy reaction, Adcetris (hives, breathing difficulties, or swelling of your throat or face) or a severe reaction to your skin (fever, sore throat, burning in your eyes, skin ache, and red or purple skin itching that can cause peeling and blisters),

A few side effects could be experienced during the injection or in the 24 hours following. Inform your doctor immediately if you experience dizziness, nausea, feeling chilly or shivering, or if you experience an itch or difficulty breathing.

Brentuximab vedotin can cause a serious brain injury, which can cause the loss of a job or even death. Consult your doctor immediately when you experience issues with your speech, thoughts, vision, or movement. These symptoms may begin gradually and become more severe.

Adverse Effects 

Contact your physician. If you experience any of these adverse reactions, even if they occur a few months after the time you received Adcetris,

  • The sensation of numbness, weakness, burning pain, tingling sensation, or loss of feeling in your legs or arms;

  • Suddenly experiencing chest discomfort or pain with a dry cough, wheezing, or feeling tired;

  • discomfort or burning sensation after you urinate;

  • Blood sugar levels are high—more thirst, more frequent urination, dry mouth, fruity breath smell;

  • Ketoacidosis (too much acid in the blood): nausea, stomach pain, vomiting, dizziness, unusual drowsiness, or difficulty breathing;

  • Low blood cells (fever, chills, fatigue, skin sores, mouth sores, easy bruising, abnormal bleeding, pale skin and feet, cold hands, and feeling lightheaded and short of breath)

  • Indications of tumor cell loss such as weakness, confusion, and muscle cramps. nausea, vomiting, and rapid heart rates reduced urination sensations of tingling in your hands, feet, or mouth.

  • Pancreatitis The pain is intense in your stomach that spreads into your lower back; nausea, and even vomiting;

  • Liver issues—nausea and vomiting (upper right side) fatigue, tiredness, dark urine, jaundice (yellowing of the eyes or skin).

  • Stomach issues The most severe symptoms are constipation, new or progressively worsening stomach pain, bloody or tarry stool bleeding blood, or vomit that appears to be coffee grounds.

Mild Effects 

  • Tingling or numbness;

  • Fever;

  • Low blood cell count;

  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or

  • Feeling exhausted.

This isn't a complete list of all the side effects. Other side effects could occur. Consult your physician for advice regarding medical adverse effects. You may report any adverse reactions to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Interaction with Other Drugs

There are times when it's not recommended to take certain medicines together. Certain drugs may affect the blood levels of other medications you are taking, which could cause more side effects or make the drugs less effective.

Other medications may be incompatible with brentuximab vedotin, such as prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and herbal products. Inform your physician about your current medications as well as any medications you are about to start or stop taking.

DRUG STATUS

Availability

Prescription only

Pregnancy & Lactation

CSA Schedule*

Related Drugs
Related Stories

Images