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Polaramine

Generic name: dexchlorpheniramine [dex-klor-fen-IR-a-meen]
Drug class: antihistamines

There is no evidence that the Polaramine brand name was taken off the market across the U.S. If the generic versions of this product were approved by the FDA, it is possible that there are alternatives that are generic.

What is Polaramine?

Polaramine acts as an antihistamine. It neutralizes any effects caused by the chemical histamine that is present in your body. Polaramine is a treatment for running noses, sneezing, itching, and watery eyes; itching; rashes; hives; as well as other signs of allergies and the common cold. Polaramine is also used for other purposes than those mentioned in this guideline for medication.

Warnings

Be cautious when operating machinery, driving, or engaging in other risky actions. Polaramine could cause dizziness and sleepiness. If you feel dizzy or drowsy, be sure to avoid these types of activities.

Be cautious when drinking alcohol. Alcohol can increase drowsiness and dizziness when you take this medication.

Don't crush, chew, or break any form of timed release of polaramine. Inhale them completely. They're specially designed to be released slowly throughout your entire body.

How to take polaramine?

Do not consume polaramine in the event that you've previously used a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) like isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the past 14 days. A highly dangerous drug interaction can occur, resulting in severe negative side effects.

Before you take this medication, be sure to inform your doctor about any medical conditions you suffer from.

  • Glaucoma, or pressure that is increased on the cornea,
  • A stomach ulcer;
  • An overly large prostate, bladder problems, or trouble urinating;
  • Hyperactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism);
  • Hypertension or any kind of heart issue;

There is a chance that you won't be able to take Polaramine or require reduced doses or specific monitoring while you suffer from any of the above conditions.

Dexchlorpheniramine is unlikely to harm a baby who is not yet born. Don't take this medication without consulting your doctor if you expect

Babies are the most susceptible to the adverse effects of antihistamines. Severe side effects may occur when a baby is nursing. Polaramine is not advised if you breastfeed your baby. Do not take this medication without consulting your physician if you're breastfeeding the baby.

If you're older than 60 years old, you are more likely to suffer negative side effects resulting from polaramine. It is possible that you will require a lower dosage of this drug.

How to take Polaramine?

Take polaramine exactly as prescribed by your physician. If you don't understand these instructions, consult your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor for help explaining the directions to you. Every dose is taken by sipping a full cup of water. Polaramine is a supplement with and without meals. Avoid crushing, chewing, or breaking any form of timed release of polaramine. Take them in whole. They're specially formulated to be released slowly throughout your entire body.

To ensure that you are getting the correct dosage, take the syrup version of Polaramine using a specific dose-measuring spoon or cup and not a standard tablespoon. If you don't have an instrument for measuring doses and you are unsure of the best method to use, ask your pharmacist how you can purchase one.

Do not take more medicine than is prescribed to you. The tablets that release regular doses and syrup are generally consumed every four to six hours, as required (four up to six times per day). The capsules and tablets that release time are typically taken every 8–10 hours, depending on the need (two or even three times per day). Keep this medicine at cool, dry temperatures, away from heat and moisture.

What happens if I miss the dose?

Do the missed dose immediately when you remember. However, if it's close to time to take your next dose, you can skip your missed dosage and consume only your next scheduled dose. Don't take a double dosage of the medication unless prescribed by your physician.

What happens if I overdose?

Get medical attention in an emergency.

The symptoms of an overdose of dexchlorpheniramine include severe insomnia, confusion, weak hearing loss, big pupils, blurred vision, flushing and dry mouth shaking, insomnia, fever hallucinations, and even seizures.

Aviod this

Take care when operating machinery, driving, or engaging in other risky tasks. Polaramine could cause dizziness and sleepiness. If you feel dizzy or drowsy, be sure to avoid these types of activities. Take care when using alcohol. Alcohol can cause drowsiness as well as dizziness when taking polaramine.

Side effects of Polaramine (dexchlorpheniramine)

Do not take Polaramine, and seek medical attention if there are symptoms associated with an allergen-related reaction (difficulty breathing, closing your throat, swelling of your tongue, lips, or face), or an allergic reaction (hives).

Other, less severe polaramine adverse reactions are more likely to happen. Take this medication as directed, and speak to your doctor when you notice

  • Fatigue, sleepiness, or dizziness.
  • Headache;
  • Dry mouth dry mouth
  • Trouble urinating or an overly large prostate.

Additional side effects not mentioned here could also be present. Consult your physician about any side effect you think is unusual or painful. It is possible to report any adverse reactions to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Interaction with other drugs

Do not use polaramine in the event that you've previously used a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) like isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the last 14 days. A highly dangerous drug interaction can occur, resulting in serious adverse side effects.

Speak to your doctor before using other prescription cold, cough, or insomnia medicines. These medications may contain substances like dexchlorpheniramine. This can result in an overdose of antihistamines.

Before you take this medicine, inform your physician whether you are taking any of these medications:

  • Insomnia or sleep medications like alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), or temazepam (Restoril), as well as triazolam (Halcion);
  • Drugs for depression like amtriptyline (Elavil), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), as well as
  • Or other medicines that make you feel sleepy, drowsy, or relaxed.

Different medications other than those listed may be incompatible with dexchlorpheniramine. Discuss with your physician and pharmacist prior to taking any prescription or other over-the-counter medications.